HOW DOES LICENSING WORK?

For you to license your work on LA Underground Radio you will need to own or be licensed to use all of the copyright licenses associated with your work.

Guidelines for Unsigned Musicians, Bands and Electronic Music

Example #1: You wrote the song, performed, recorded and published the song. You can fully license your work.

Example #2: You and a friend wrote the song, performed, recorded and published the song. You will need to obtain permission from your friend to license that song.

Example #3: You wrote the song, your friends played an instrument, you recorded and published the song. You will need to obtain permission from all of your friends to license your song.

Example #4: You wrote the song, performed, but a record label recorded and published the song. You will need to obtain permission from the record label to license your song or you can ask the record label to submit your song on your behalf but you will need to license them.

Example #5: You wrote the song, your friends played an instrument, a recorded label recorded the song and a publishing company distributed your song. You will need to obtain permission from all to license your work.

Guidelines for Independent Labels

You will need to obtain permission from the Artist, Performer, Songwriter and Publisher before submitting any work to LA Underground Radio.

Common definitions

• Artist
Artists records sound recordings. A band is an artist. A rapper is an artist. A singer is an artist.

• Songwriter
Songwriters write the compositions.

• Sound Recording
Some call this the “master”. Sound recordings are not to be confused with compositions. Artists record sound recordings.

• Composition
This is the song. Not the recording. Songwriters write compositions.

• Record labels
Represent artists. Labels own the master.

• Publishing companies
Represent songwriters.

• PROs
Performing Rights Organizations. In the US, these are ASCAP, BMI, SESAC and GMR. These organizations represent songwriters and publishers.

• SoundExchange
SoundExchange is a performing rights organization and represent artists and labels.

The 6 Types of Music License

• Synchronization License (Sync License)

This method of licensing refers to music that is going to be paired with some form of visual media. It has a broad range of uses, including TV commercials, studio films, streaming advertisements, personal films, internal communications, and more.

• Mechanical License

A mechanical license is needed for any physical reproduction of an artist’s work. Primarily this refers to the manufacturing of CDs or distribution of music in any tangible form.

• Master License

A master right is held by the person who owns the recording of a song. Generally a master license is issued in conjunction with a sync license.

• Public Performance License

This license applies generally to any broadcast of an artist’s work.

• Print Rights License

This license refers to the physical copy of the sheet music that an artist has created.

• Theatrical License

The license is required any time a copyrighted work is performed on-stage in front of an audience.

 

Disclaimer

Legal Information Is Not Legal Advice

All materials have been prepared for general information purposes only to permit you to learn more about the law and our services. The information presented is not legal advice, is not to be acted on as such, may not be current and is subject to change without notice.

This information is only one source of information among the many sources that are available to you. You may wish to consider multiple sources and/or getting legal advice in order to make an informed decision.

We make no representation, guarantee or warranty (express or implied) as to the legal validity, quality, or reliability of any legal information provided in connection to our Services.